Are You Prepared? Wildfires

Updated: Jun 15, 2018

Many homeowners face the risk of wildfires, which are usually triggered by lightning or accidents. They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees and homes. Some homes survive, but unfortunately, many others do not. Those that survive almost always do so because their owners had prepared for fire. Reduce your risk by preparing now to protect your family, home and property.

Preparing Your Home for a Wildfire

The following are things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your property in the event of a fire:

  • Design and landscape your home with wildfire safety in mind. Select materials and plants that can help contain fire rather than fuel it:

  1. Use fire-resistant or noncombustible materials on the roof and exterior structure of your house, or treat wood or combustible material used in roofs, siding, decking or trim with fire-retardant chemicals evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

  2. Plant fire-resistant shrubs and trees. For example, hardwood trees are less flammable than pine, evergreen, eucalyptus or fir trees.

  • Regularly clean your roof and gutters; remove any debris that could catch fire.

  • Inspect your chimneys at least twice a year, and clean them at least once a year. Keep the dampers in good working order. Equip chimneys and stovepipes with a spark arrester that meets the requirements of National Fire Protection Association Standard 211. Contact your local fire department for exact specifications.

  • Install 1/8-inch mesh screen beneath porches, decks, floor areas and the home itself to prevent debris and combustible materials from accumulating. You should also cover openings to floors, roof and attic with mesh screens to prevent sparks and embers from entering your home.

  • Install a dual-sensor smoke alarm on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms; test it every month and change the batteries at least once each year.

  • Teach your family members how to use a fire extinguisher (ABC type), and show them where it's kept.

  • Keep household items available that can be used as fire tools, such as rake, axe, handsaw or chain saw, bucket and shovel.

  • Keep a ladder that will reach the roof in case a family member ends up on the roof of a burning house.

  • Consider installing protective shutters or heavy fire-resistant drapes.

  • Move flammable items away from the house and outside of your defensible space, including woodpiles, lawn furniture, barbecue grills and tarp coverings.

Plan Your Water Needs

Make sure that you have easy and reliable access to water:

  • Identify and maintain an adequate outside water source, such as a small pond, cistern, well, swimming pool or hydrant.

  • Have a garden hose that is long enough to reach any area of the home and other structures on the property.

  • Install freeze-proof exterior water outlets on at least two sides of the home and near other structures on the property. Install additional outlets at least 50 feet from the home.

  • Consider obtaining a portable gasoline-powered pump in case electrical power is cut off.

It is recommended that you create a 30- to 100-foot safety zone around your home. Within this area, you can take steps to reduce potential exposure to flames and radiant heat. Homes built in pine forests should have a minimum safety zone of 100 feet. If your home sits on a steep slope, standard protective measures may not be enough. Contact your local fire department or forestry office for additional information. Here are some tips to create a safety-zone:

  • Rake leaves, dead limbs and twigs. Clear all flammable vegetation. Remove leaves and rubbish from under structures.

  • Thin a 15-foot space between tree crowns, and remove limbs within 15 feet of the ground.

  • Remove dead branches that extend over the roof.

  • Prune tree branches and shrubs within 15 feet of a stovepipe or chimney outlet.

  • Ask the power company to clear branches from power lines.

  • Remove vines from the walls of the home.

  • Mow grass regularly.

  • Clear a 10-foot area around propane tanks and the barbecue. Use a screen made of nonflammable material with mesh no coarser than 1/4 inch.

  • Regularly dispose of newspapers and rubbish at an approved site. Follow local burning regulations.

  • Place stove, fireplace and grill ashes in a metal bucket and soak them in water for two days, then bury the cold ashes in mineral soil.